Seafood success

South Australia’s diverse and abundant seafood industry offers a wonderful opportunity to present some of the finest quality seafood in the world on your menu.

With a little advice on preparing a few of South Australia’s unique seafood products and access to fresh product, you will be serving up an exceptional dish every time.

This masterclass provides expert advice on preparing calamari, Hiramasa kingfish, King George whiting and blue swimmer crab, ready for use in your own recipes.

CALAMARI

  1. CALAMARI
    Gripping the head, push thumb between cartilage and the hood to remove the wings from the hood, pierce skin and pull hood from wings and skin. Repeat for other wings.
  2. CALAMARI
    Gripping hood firmly, pierce skin with thumb and pull from hood and wings.
  3. CALAMARI
    Use knife to slice cartilage away from wings.
  4. CALAMARI
    Grip head and top of quill firmly. Pull head and backbone from rest of body. Cut beak and eyes from tentacles.
  5. CALAMARI
    Remove ink sac (keep for risotto or pasta dishes). It is easier to remove ink sacs when partially frozen.
  6. CALAMARI
    Cleaned hood, wings and legs, with ink sac. The hood and wings can also be sliced into rings.

HIRAMASA KINGFISH

  1. HIRAMASA KINGFISH
    Cut under pectoral fin, just behind the head, slice on a diagonal on both sides. Pull head back sharply and snap off. (Head can be kept to make fish stock or to flavour miso soup.)
  2. HIRAMASA KINGFISH
    Insert knife at shoulder, follow along backbone. Incision should only cut halfway into fish.
  3. HIRAMASA KINGFISH
    Insert knife into thickest part of fish (about midway) and slice through to the anal fin, then use knife to slice through, following ribcage. Repeat on other side.
  4. HIRAMASA KINGFISH
    Remove pin bones by cutting top and bottom of loins from either side.
  5. HIRAMASA KINGFISH
    If you wish to remove skin (it can be eaten), hold tail firmly and pull skin against knife.
  6. HIRAMASA KINGFISH
    As boneless fillets, meat recovery is about 45%. However, in traditional Japanese style fillet (collar on, ribcage in), it is about 65%.

KING GEORGE WHITING

  1. KING GEORGE WHITING
    Remove head by cutting on an angle from behind pectoral and ventrical fins.
  2. KING GEORGE WHITING
    Place knife into the shoulder of the fish and cut halfway along the backbone to tail. It helps to place hand at top of fish to help guide the knife.
  3. KING GEORGE WHITING
    Transfer weight of hand to base end of the fish. Using rib cage as a guide, slice under the fillet and remove.
  4. KING GEORGE WHITING
    Turn over and repeat step 2 and 3 for the other side.
  5. KING GEORGE WHITING
    Again follow rib cage to fully remove fillet. Once both fillets are removed you should be able to see through backbone.
  6. KING GEORGE WHITING
    Remove central pin bones by making a small ‘v’ into each fillet. Also check all the rib bones have been removed. Most whiting offer 50% meat recovery.

BLUE SWIMMER CRAB

  1. BLUE SWIMMER CRAB
    Turn crab upside down. Lift flap on underside and pull top shell away from body.
  2. BLUE SWIMMER CRAB
    Remove gills by gently pulling away from the body of the crab.
  3. BLUE SWIMMER CRAB
    Cut crab in half by slicing down middle, between the eyes.
  4. BLUE SWIMMER CRAB
    Remove large claws by twisting and pulling them away from body. Most of the meat is in the body, near the back swimming legs.
  5. BLUE SWIMMER CRAB
    Slice legs lengthwise. Crack shell on legs to remove meat.
  6. BLUE SWIMMER CRAB
    Shell can be used for serving. Remove membrane on inside and rinse. A crab’s average meat yield is about 35%.

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